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Spotlight: Romania. A Film and Photography Festival

KETELHUIS | Online €5 | Kassa €6

Reconstruction (1968)

Spotlight: Romania. A Film  and Photography Festival
This October we're turning all lights eastwards, and put Romanian culture in the spotlight. Spotlight: Romania is a one month cinema and photography festival, which will showcase some of the best contemporary films and photography series coming out of the country. They are guaranteed to surprise, change minds and hearts and introduce you to the real feel, the depth and charms of Romania.

The festival's cinema program hosted by DNR consists of feature films from the established Romanian New Wave and several short films from emerging filmmakers. One evening is dedicated to the cult filmmaker Lucian Pintilie. All screenings are with English subtitles and will be paired with talks and Q&A’s with filmmakers and other guests from the industry.

Spotlight: Romania is completed by a large documentary photography group exhibition on show throughout October in Gemak art gallery, together with a side program centered on Migration and Cultural diversity. Spotlight: Romania is a project by the cultural initiative Eastwards, in partnership with DNR and Gemak.

Lucian Pintilie is a Romanian-born theatre, opera and cinema director, a significant and seminal auteur considered one of Europe's finest filmmakers. His work spans over five decades, both in Romania, as well as in France, where he moved after leaving communist Romania as his films had been censored and eventually banned. His style is the theatre of the Absurd on film or, rather, Cinema of the Absurd, and in his films he often explored with black wit questions of tyranny and remorse, often relating directly or allegorically to the history of Romania. He has been credited as being the father of the Romanian New Cinema Wave.

Reconstruction
Reconstruction is exquisitely compiled of unconventional compositions, theatrical gestures and political machinations that are all set against the mesmerizing scenery of the Carpathian Mountains. The story is loosely based on an actual event in  which two teenagers involved in a drunken brawl are sentenced by a magistrate to re-enact their crime for an educational film on the dangers of alcohol.

The film uses the re-enactment to mock the absurd nature of law enforcement perpetrated in communist Romania. The idea that the re-enactment becomes more and more real, is in fact a prophesy of the progressive invasive tyranny that would persevere for many years after Reconstruction was released.

Although it was initially banned by the communist regime, Reconstruction had its international premiere at Cannes in 1970, and the filmmaker was lauded in absentia; today it is considered a seminal work of the New Romanian Cinema.