DNR Filmclub - Palestinorama!

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Wedding in Galilee (Michel Khleifi, 1987)

GROTE ZAAL | Online €5 | Kassa €6

One of the first Palestinian film productions.

Please note that there was a last minute change of dates. The updated schedule can be found here, and on facebook.

Palestinorama!
 Is a festival dedicated to Palestinian culture. The festival revolves around Palestinian cinema, and includes live music, art, poetry, food and more. The festival’s goal is to expose audiences to a broad panoramic view of the richness, beauty and complexity of the Palestinian cultural life. The festival is a collaboration between the theatre De Nieuwe Regentes, DNR Filmclub, Pardes Producties and Muawiya Shehadeh.

19:15 | Foyer | Reception with Palestinian live music and finger-food

20:15 | Grote Zaal | Film: Wedding in Galilee (Michel Khleifi, 1987) / 114 min
The screening will be held in the presence of the film’s director, 
Michel Khleifi, with Q&A after the screening about his work and Palestinian cinema in general.

The screening will be held in the presence of the film’s director, Michel Khleifi, with Q&A after the screening about his work and Palestinian cinema in general.
The elder of a Palestinian village under Israeli military rule needs permission to hold a traditional wedding for his son that will go past the imposed night curfew. The Army commander agrees, on the condition that he and his officers will be invited as guests of honor at the ceremony.
One of the first Palestinian film productions, Wedding in Galilee is a richly-detailed allegory of marriage, tradition and national identity. In his first full feature film Michel Khleifi displayed the narrative-documentary style – blending realism, fiction, myth, and ritual – that he went on to develop with such great effect. It also announced some of the major themes that permeate his later work: the centrality of the land to Palestinian identity; the preservation of collective memory and culture; the difficulty of telling the history of the nation; the trauma of defeat, displacement and exile; and his critique of the weakness and paralysis of what he considers to be an archaic Arab society.